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Words that get confused
Old 03-23-2017, 08:20 PM   #1
Blaze
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Default Words that get confused

this thread is likely gonna come off as me being an ass. regardless.. whether people didn't learn the proper definitions in school.. or you natively speak another language. here are some common words you may confuse and some examples of their proper usage/definitions.


Loose vs Lose

1) not firmly or tightly fixed in place; detached or able to be detached. 2) (of a garment) not fitting tightly or closely. 3) set free; release.
Examples: His shoelaces are loose. They loosed the dogs.

Lose: 1) be deprived of or cease to have or retain (something). 2) become unable to find (something or someone).
Examples: He lost his keys. He is losing the tournament.


Than vs Then.

Than: 1) introducing the second element in a comparison. 2) used in expressions introducing an exception or contrast.
Examples: I would rather eat pizza than have spaghetti. I would rather stay here than come to you.

Then: 1) at that time; at the time in question. 2) after that; next; afterward.
Examples: I liked how things were back then. So you were right then.


Here vs Hear.

Here: 1) in, at, or to this place or position. 2) used when introducing something or someone. 3) used to attract someone's attention. 4) indicating one's presence in a roll call.
Examples: Here I am. There are recalls here.

Hear: 1) perceive with the ear the sound made by. (someone or something). 2) be told or informed of. 3) be aware of; know of the existence of.
Examples: I hear something down the hall. Did you hear Thomas is going out with Marie?


There vs Their vs They're.


There: 1) in, at, or to that place or position. 2) used in attracting someone's attention or calling attention to someone or something. 3) used to focus attention on something and express satisfaction or annoyance at it. 4) used to comfort someone.
Examples: We went there last spring. There you are. There, told you so! There, there sweetie. There will be other chances to go to the park.

Their: 1) belonging to or associated with the people or things previously mentioned or easily identified. 2) used in titles.
Examples: We're going to their house for the barbecue. That's their new car.

They're: they are. Literally the two words they are combined as a contraction with the apostrophe.
Examples: They're going on vacation in Italy. They're our new neighbors.



Too vs To vs Two.

Too: 1) to a higher degree than is desirable, permissible, or possible; excessively. 2) in addition; also.
Examples: You're going too fast. You're pushing yourself too hard. Count me in too.

To: 1) expressing motion in the direction of (a particular location).2) identifying the person or thing affected. 3) used with the base form of a verb to indicate that the verb is in the infinitive, in particular. 4) used without a verb following when the missing verb is clearly understood. 5) so as to be closed or nearly closed.
Examples: We're going to John's house. You're giving those to her?


We're vs Wear vs Were vs Where.


We're: We are.
Examples: We're going to Cindy's house. We're the Johnsons.

Wear:1) have on one's body or a part of one's body as clothing, decoration, protection, or for some other purpose. 2) damage, erode, or destroy by friction or use. 3) the wearing of something or the state of being worn as clothing. 4) clothing suitable for a particular purpose or of a particular type.
Examples: I'm wearing my favorite shirt. The road is worse for wear.

Were: second person singular past, plural past, and past subjunctive of be.
Examples: Things were different back then. What were the sales like last month?

Where: 1) in or to what place or position. 2) at, in, or to which (used after reference to a place or situation). 3) the place or situation in which. 4) that. 5) whereas.
Examples: Where have you been, young lady? Let's go to the place where we first met. Home is where the heart is.



Your vs You're.

Your: 1) belonging to or associated with the person or people that the speaker is addressing. 2) belonging to or associated with any person in general.
Example: When is your birthday? Where are your parents?

You're: You are.
Example: You're beautiful. You're going to have to fix that.


Its vs It's.

Its: 1) belonging to or associated with a thing previously mentioned or easily identified. 2) belonging to or associated with a child or animal of unspecified gender.
Examples: The bike needs its tires aired up. The dog is chasing its tail.

It's: 1) It is. 2) It has.
Examples: It's raining outside. It's been raining all day.

Loath vs Loathe.

Loath: reluctant; unwilling.
Examples: I'm loath to leave you alone. The bank is loath to give me a loan.

Loathe: feel intense dislike or disgust for.
Examples: I started to loathe Brad after I saw him bullying Peter. I loathe spaghetti.



Brake vs Break

Brake: 1) a device for slowing or stopping a moving vehicle, typically by applying pressure to the wheels. 2) make a moving vehicle slow down or stop by using a brake.
Examples: He stepped on the brake as they came up to the red light.

Break: 1) separate or cause to separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain. 2) interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course). 3) an interruption of continuity or uniformity. 4) pause in work or during an activity or event.
Examples: She broke the vase when she tripped. They're going on their lunch break. Since the vase is fragile it is easy to break.


Since vs Sense.

Since: 1) in the intervening period between (the time mentioned) and the time under consideration, typically the present. 2) for the reason that: because.
Examples: Things have been different since he started high school. They've been a reliable company since 1957.

Sense: 1) a faculty by which the body perceives an external stimulus; one of the faculties of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. 2) a feeling that something is the case. 3) perceive by a sense or senses.
Examples: Dogs have stronger senses of smell and hearing than humans. I sense a disturbance in the force.


Accept vs Except

Accept: 1) consent to receive (a thing offered). 2) believe or come to recognize (an opinion, explanation, etc.) as valid or correct.
Examples: I can accept what he said it right. I accepted his help.

Except: 1) not including; other than. 2) used before a statement that forms an exception to one just made. 3) specify as not included in a category or group; exclude.
Examples: I have everything I need, except her. There's no food in the fridge except leftover pizza.



Affect vs Effect

Affect: 1) have an effect on; make a difference to. 2) touch the feelings of (someone); move emotionally.
Examples: The effects of the poison was having an affect on him. The Sandy Hook incident affected him emotionally.

Effect: 1) a change that is a result or consequence of an action or other cause. 2) the lighting, sound, or scenery used in a play, movie, or broadcast. 3) cause (something) to happen; bring about.
Examples: The effects of the poison will paralyze him. They spent a lot of money on the movie's special effects.


Waste vs Waist

Waste: 1) use or expend carelessly, extravagantly, or to no purpose. 2) (of a person or a part of the body) become progressively weaker and more emaciated. 3) (of a material, substance, or byproduct) eliminated or discarded as no longer useful or required after the completion of a process. 4) (of an area of land, typically in a city or town) not used, cultivated, or built on. 5) an act or instance of using or expending something carelessly, extravagantly, or to no purpose. 6) material that is not wanted; the unusable remains or byproducts of something.
Examples: Don't waste food. It's not intelligent to keep wasting your time arguing. Be careful when dealing with human waste.

Waist: 1) the part of the human body below the ribs and above the hips.
2) the circumference of this. 3) a narrowing of the trunk of the body above the hips.
Examples: He wrapped his arms around her waist. Her waist is 24 inches.


Fewer vs Less
This one has a rule: The traditional advice is that fewer is for things you count, and less is for things you don?t count. some of the exceptions to the simple rule is to use less for singular nouns and fewer for plural nouns.

Fewer: 1) of a smaller number. 2) a smaller number.
Examples: I ate fewer M&Ms than my friend. (Using fewer on plural M&Ms)

Less: 1) a smaller amount of; not as much. 2) of lower rank or importance. 3) to a smaller extent; not so much. 4) before subtracting (something); minus.
Examples: I ate less candy than my friend. (Using less on singular candy).


Good vs Well

Good meaning: 1) to be desired or approved of. 2) having the qualities required for a particular role. 3) that which is morally right; righteousness. 4) benefit or advantage to someone or something.
Examples: I'm good. (On a normal day). They have good school systems there. This is good food.

Well: 1) in a good or satisfactory way. 2) in a thorough manner. 3) in good health; free or recovered from illness. 4) sensible; advisable.
Examples: They performed well tonight. He swam well. I'm well. (after recovering from illness). You would to well to heed my warning.


Whose vs Who's

Whose: 1) belonging to or associated with which person. 2) of whom or which (used to indicate that the following noun belongs to or is associated with the person or thing mentioned in the previous clause).
Examples: Whose house are we going to? There are only a feel people whose opinions I repect.

Who's: 1) who is. 2) who has.
Examples: Who's going to the party tonight? Who's seen the new Marvel movie?


Pore vs Pour vs Poor

Pour: 1) (especially of a liquid) flow rapidly in a steady stream. 2) cause (a liquid) to flow from a container in a steady stream by holding the container at an angle. 3) prepare and serve (a drink).
Examples: He poured her a drink. The rain was pouring outside.

Poor: 1) lacking sufficient money to live at a standard considered comfortable or normal in a society. 2) worse than is usual, expected, or desirable; of a low or inferior standard or quality.
Examples: His family is poor so they can't afford to get a new car. The quality of his shoes were rather poor after a few years of use.


Threw vs Through vs Thru

Threw: propel (something) with force through the air by a movement of the arm and hand.
Example: He threw the football 20 yards.

Through: 1) moving in one side and out of the other side of (an opening, channel, or location). 2) continuing in time toward completion of (a process or period). 3) (of a means of public transportation or a ticket) continuing or valid to the final destination. 4) denoting traffic that passes from one side of a place to another in the course of a longer journey.
Examples: If you want to hurt her, you have to go through me! He went through the doorway.

Thru: informal spelling of through. Basically identical to through but more like a slang. Not recommended for official papers, but fine for shorthand writing.


Bear vs Bare

Bear: 1) (of a person) carry. 2) support. 3) refers to carnivoran mammals of the family Ursidae. Bears are classified as caniforms, or doglike carnivorans.
Examples: My cousin came bearing gifts for us. He resolved himself to bear her weight as he carried her to safety. They were scared of the bear.

Bare: 1) (of a person or part of the body) not clothed or covered.
2) without addition; basic and simple. 3) a large amount or number of.
Examples: Tarzan's chest was bare as he swung from tree to tree. The walls were bare when they moved in.


Dual vs Duel

Dual: 1) consisting of two parts, elements, or aspects. 2) (of a theorem, expression, etc.) related to another by the interchange of particular pairs of terms, such as ?point? and ?line.?. 3) a dual form of a word. 4) a theorem, expression, etc., that is dual to another.
Examples: He has dual citizenship in Canada and the United States. She is dual wielding two swords.

Duel: 1) a contest with deadly weapons arranged between two people in order to settle a point of honor. 2) fight a duel or duels.
Examples: They had a duel over the love of a maiden. They dueled with rapier swords.


Imply vs Infer

Imply: 1) strongly suggest the truth or existence of (something not expressly stated). 2) (of a fact or occurrence) suggest (something) as a logical consequence.
Examples: He implied his friend was a Justin Bieber fan. It was implied that he was a skilled artist.

Infer: deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements.
Examples: Miranda inferred that the killer was Colonel Mustard, after collecting several clues.



Allot vs Alot vs A Lot

Allot: give or apportion (something) to someone as a share or task.
Example: You will be allotted one hour for this exam.

Alot: Not a word. Do not use it.

A Lot: a large number or amount; a great deal.
Example: He has a lot of stuff.

A lot are two separate words, but people treat them like one. This is improper as alot is not a word.



Who vs Whom


Who: 1) what or which person or people. 2) used to introduce a clause giving further information about a person or people previously mentioned.
Examples: Who made the burgers? Jane is the one who made the burgers.

Whom: used instead of “who” as the object of a verb or preposition.
Examples: Whom are you going to marry?

Now these may sound similar but there is a difference.

A way to remember them is who = (s)he. Whom = him/her. The answers depend on which is used.

Who made the burgers? She made the burgers.
Whom made the burgers? Her made the burgers.

Obviously whom doesn't fit there.

To who did you give a necklace to? I gave a necklace to she.
To whom did you give a necklace to? I gave a necklace to her.

Whom fits better here.


Which vs That

The way to remember it is:
When you can get rid of it without changing the meaning of the sentence, use which (and commas around the additional information).
When you cannot get rid of it without changing the meaning, use that. You don't require additional commas in these cases.

Which: 1) asking for information specifying one or more people or things from a definite set 2) used referring to something previously mentioned when introducing a clause giving further information.

Example: Sapphires, which are often blue, make beautiful necklaces. Hamburger, which is beef, tastes good.
In both cases we can leave out the which part in the comma.
They become: Sapphires make beautiful necklaces. / Hamburger tastes good. Both still convey the same meaning.

That: 1) used to identify a specific person or thing observed by the speaker. 2) referring to a specific thing previously mentioned, known, or understood. 3) used to identify a specific person or thing observed or heard by the speaker. 4) referring to a specific thing previously mentioned, known, or understood. 5) to such a degree; so. 6) introducing a subordinate clause expressing a statement or hypothesis. 7) expressing a wish or regret.

Examples: I love things that you make me. There is a sale on dresses that have a blue sticker.
You can't take out the that in those things without changing the meaning. If you take that out of the second one that means all dresses are on sale.

Last edited by Blaze; 03-26-2017 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 03-23-2017, 11:57 PM   #2
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Moved lose/loose to the top, sense its probably the one your most likely to here used incorrectly threw the internet.
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Old 03-24-2017, 12:50 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitchless View Post
Moved lose/loose to the top, sense its probably the one your most likely to here used incorrectly threw the internet.
rofl
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Old 03-24-2017, 04:13 AM   #4
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*enrolls in nod's balzing grammar school*
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Old 03-25-2017, 04:55 PM   #5
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Who vs Whom added.
Allot vs A Lot vs Alot added.
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Old 03-25-2017, 06:29 PM   #6
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Where added to wear vs were vs we're list because of boltztheclown.
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Old 03-25-2017, 10:02 PM   #7
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boltzy is pretty chatty for a guy who's taking way to long to level up (3 levels in almost a week)
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Old 03-27-2017, 05:07 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitchless View Post
Moved lose/loose to the top, sense its probably the one your most likely to here used incorrectly threw the internet.
I just re-read this like 10 times and still not a lot of sense was made... Thanks glitchy for the emotional trauma caused by this.

Sincerely, a NON-native English speaker
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Old 03-28-2017, 06:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felixandru View Post
I just re-read this like 10 times and still not a lot of sense was made... Thanks glitchy for the emotional trauma caused by this.

Sincerely, a NON-native English speaker
No hablo espanol
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Old 03-28-2017, 07:28 AM   #10
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Help vs Self-fellate
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You won't be warned again.
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Old 03-28-2017, 04:50 PM   #11
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Don't mind lil ol' me I'm just here LMMFAO!
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Old 04-11-2017, 05:19 AM   #12
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all this grammer makes me hungry...omg i need a sammich nao
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Old 04-11-2017, 09:45 AM   #13
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Grammar :{
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